Archives 2016

hiring HR

Hire only fully formed adults: How soft skills improve your bottom line

Under the direction of Reed Hastings and Patty McCord, Netflix prospered with groundbreaking HR policies, which Patty wrote about in How Netflix Reinvented HR (Harvard Business Review, December 2014). The first of five basic precepts that drove Netflix’s HR policies is “Hire, reward, and tolerate only fully formed adults.”

Mrs. McCord was the Chief Talent Officer for Netflix at the time. She believes the majority of workers will try to do the right thing and act in the company’s best interests when making business decisions.

She goes on to say that “Most companies spend endless time and money ...

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Uncategorized

Business Insider recently did a piece suggesting startups have gotten "very boring". http://read.bi/PRC3UQ

I don't think the tech industry is any more or less capable of substance than others. It's only the speed at which it moves that sometimes makes it seem void. The offerings come fast and in big numbers, so the fathoms that inevitably disappoint seem monumental.

Like with any other era or industry or sector, it takes some time and dedicated thought to identify the rare opportunity that offers tangible value, makes real street-level change, and can provide growth and profitability. (See what Steve ...

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awareness business

The Key to Success

What’s the key to success? It’s a question that haunts even the most relaxed among us. We all have skills we’d like to sharpen, things we’d like to do, goals we’d like to achieve. But only a select few achieve at an elite level. So what’s their secret? New research shows that those super achievers — the Tony Hsiehes and Marc Cubans of the world — have found the right balance of pride and humility.

But words "pride" and "humility" don’t necessarily mean what you think. According to researcher June Price Tangney, humility is less a trait than a ...

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awareness business change

What Makes People Happy at Work?

A fully stocked fridge? Unlimited vacation time? The freedom to work from home? In many sectors, particularly the youthful, tech-heavy ones, these are commonplace perks designed to reward hardworking employees. But do they make employees happier? Statistics say no.

Even though the workplace, and our relationship to it, has changed dramatically, employee satisfaction rates haven’t budged in ten years. According to a recent post on 6seconds, employees often read these perks as acts of manipulation rather than benevolence— a means to control behavior. It’s a classic case of misplaced priorities: “The majority of current engagement strategies focus on ...

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